Clinic business

Live Updates | GOP Sen. Murkowski ‘shaken’ by abortion bill

WASHINGTON — Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, one of the few Senate Republicans in favor of protecting abortion access, reacted with concern Tuesday to the Supreme Court’s draft opinion that would overturn Roe v. Wade.

“My confidence in the court has been shaken,” Murkowski told reporters on Capitol Hill.

Murkowski denounced the leak of the draft resolution as “absolutely wrong” – the Supreme Court is currently investigating – and warned that “we don’t know what direction this decision may ultimately take”.

Still, she noted that she had already proposed legislation with fellow Republican Senator Susan Collins of Maine that would codify abortion rights.

“I thought it made sense then and I think it maybe makes more sense” now, she said.

The court is expected to rule on the abortion case before its term ends in late June or early July.

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KEY DEVELOPMENTS IN ABORTION HISTORY:

– Biden says if Roe v. Wade is canceled, other rights could be next

– Chief Justice John Roberts launches an inquiry into the leak

— Several state abortion bans would go into effect if Roe is overturned

— Leak of draft opinion came as a shock to Supreme Court watchers

— News of the draft advisory reverberated in Michigan, which banned abortion before Roe

Find all AP stories on abortion: https://apnews.com/hub/abortion

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OTHER DEVELOPMENTS:

JACKSON, Mississippi — Barbara Beavers, an opponent of abortion rights, stood outside Mississippi’s only abortion clinic on Tuesday next to two signs with the slogans: “Ask me for free pregnancy tests and ultrasounds” and “You don’t have to do it today.”

The Beavers, who retired from a crisis pregnancy center which is trying to persuade women not to have abortions, prayed and tried to talk to people as they got out of cars to get inside.

“I offer help and alternatives to abortion,” said Beavers, who lives in Jackson. “Abortion hurts women as well as unborn children, and so I want to offer them some sort of last – before they enter – a place of respite, help and hope.”

When asked if she thought she would ever see Roe v. Wade, Beavers replied, “Dred Scott was cancelled. It was bad law. Roe’s Bad Law v. Wade. We must defend our children, unborn or unborn. We must defend them. We must support them. We don’t need to kill them.

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WASHINGTON — Senator Elizabeth Warren is calling on Republicans to focus on trying to find out who leaked the Supreme Court’s abortion bill instead of what the court appears to be about to do.

The Massachusetts Democrat said Tuesday that “what should be investigated and prosecuted is the fact that people who have been Supreme Court appointees have stood up and said they believe in the state of law and precedent, then at the first opportunity, have changed direction by 180 degrees and go for a complete repeal of Roe.

Warren was responding to Republican Senate Leader Mitch McConnell’s call for the funder to be investigated and prosecuted.

Asked if she thought the court process was broken, Warren said, “Republicans have worked for decades to get to this day. They carefully cultivated the people who ended up on the Supreme Court. They knew what they were getting by voting for these people. And that’s what they want. It is up to all of us to make the legislative process work.”

The draft released by Politico late Monday indicates that a majority of the court is prepared to overturn the landmark 1973 decision in Roe v. Wade who legalized abortion nationwide.

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WASHINGTON — Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said the leaked Supreme Court draft decision that would overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade is an “abomination”.

The New York Democrat promised Tuesday that if the decision stands, the Senate will pass legislation to maintain women’s access to abortion.

But Schumer refrained from promising to change the Senate filibuster rules to allow Democrats to overcome the Republican filibuster and pass legislation that would save the landmark abortion law on their own.

Instead, he signaled that they would fight on the campaign trail this fall.

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WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden on Tuesday called the Supreme Court’s proposed decision that would overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 decision that protected the right to abortion.

“It worries me a lot that after 50 years we decide that a woman has no right to choose,” Biden told reporters before boarding Air Force One for a trip to Alabama.

If the decision is made, he said, “a whole range of rights” based on the presumption of privacy will be called into question, including access to contraception and same-sex marriage.

“This is a fundamental shift in American jurisprudence,” Biden said.

Biden has said he wants Congress to pass legislation codifying Roe v. Wade, but he wasn’t ready to say whether the Senate needed to circumvent the filibuster to do so.

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WASHINGTON — Chief Justice John Roberts on Tuesday upheld the authenticity of a leaked draft opinion suggesting the Supreme Court may be on the verge of overturning the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade case that legalized abortion. in all the countries.

Roberts also ordered an investigation into what he called a “gross breach of trust.”

In the High Court’s first public comment since the draft was published on Monday evening, Roberts said: ‘Although the document described in yesterday’s reports is authentic, it does not represent a decision of the Court or the final position of the Court. ‘a Member on Matters in the Case.’

“To the extent that this betrayal of the Court’s confidences was intended to undermine the integrity of our operations, it will not succeed,” he said in a written statement.

He added: ‘I have ordered the Marshal of the Court to initiate an investigation into the source of the leak.

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WASHINGTON — U.S. Health Secretary Xavier Becerra said Tuesday that women should be able to make their own decisions about their bodies.

“It’s their right,” Becerra said in a statement.

As head of the Department of Health and Human Services, Becerra reversed regulations enacted under President Donald Trump’s administration that barred federally funded family planning clinics from referring women for abortions.

Becerra noted that abortion remains a legal medical procedure and as such is a health care service.

“I strongly believe in protecting and promoting access to health care, and that includes safe and legal abortion care,” he said.

By law, federal funds cannot be used to pay for abortions except in cases of rape, incest, or to save the woman’s life.

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If the United States Supreme Court follows through on overturning the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade case that legalized abortion nationwide, it would immediately divide the country into states with access to abortion and those who forbid it.

Some states had already prepared for the possibility that the High Court could weaken or overthrow Roe, but the explosive leak of the draft opinion appeared to accelerate that movement on Tuesday, setting the country on the path to an even more confusing landscape of the right to abortion even before the court actually renders its decision.

Almost immediately after Politico released the draft on Monday night, Republicans who had encouraged a decades-long campaign to end abortion rights cheered the prospect while Democrats pledged to fight the eventual overthrow of abortion rights. a constitutional right that has been in place for nearly half a century.

In California, Democrats who control the state legislature and governor’s office released a joint statement late Monday announcing they would seek to amend the state constitution to enshrine the right to abortion.

About half of U.S. states would already have to ban abortions if Roe falls, according to abortion rights think tank Guttmacher Institute. Twenty-two states, mostly in the South and Midwest, already have full or near-total bans on the books. All but Texas are now stuck in court because of Roe.

Thirteen states have so-called trigger laws that would immediately ban abortion if Roe is overturned and would presumably go into effect if a majority of the Supreme Court votes for the bill in late June or early July.

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WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden has said “fundamental fairness and the stability of our law demand” that the United States Supreme Court not overturn the landmark case of Roe v. Wade in 1973 which legalized abortion nationwide.

In a statement Tuesday, Biden said he would work to codify abortion rights into federal law. Politico has released a draft notice suggesting the court may be on the verge of overturning the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade case.

A decision to overturn Roe would lead to abortion bans in about half the states and could have huge ramifications for this year’s election.

It’s unclear whether the draft represents the court’s final say on the matter – opinions often change during the drafting process.

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The Supreme Court is notorious for keeping secrets. Year after year, major case after major case, there is little beyond what judges say in closing arguments that suggest how they will rule.

That’s what makes the leak of an apparent draft of opinion in a major abortion case a shock to court watchers.

The draft published by Politico indicates that a majority of the court is ready to overturn the landmark 1973 decision in Roe v. Wade who legalized abortion nationwide.

There have been leaks before, but not of such magnitude. Only a handful of people have access to the decisions before they are published.

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The news that the United States Supreme Court is set to overturn the historic Roe v. Wade decision reverberates on the political battleground of Michigan.

The state has a pre-Roe abortion ban that may go into effect and is unlikely to be changed by the Republican-led legislature.

Attention quickly turns to the courts, where Democratic Governor Gretchen Whitmer and Planned Parenthood have filed lawsuits seeking to strike down the 1931 law.

The development also focuses on the November election, when the governor and lawmakers are up for re-election and voters can decide whether to enshrine abortion rights in Michigan’s Constitution.